How To Manage Time During Finals Week

Managing your time and studying effectively during finals week is so important. Often finals are worth a big chunk of your grade and it's now or never to showcase that you know what you are doing. This post is meant to help guide you through the time management process during the last few weeks of college to make sure that you are giving tests the adequate amount of time in the weeks leading up to finals week. I hope that you find this post helpful as you begin to go on this finals week journey whether this is your first finals week or your last.

How To Manage Time During Finals Week | During finals week time management is essential to being your best self. Click through to read all my tips for managing your schedule, prioritizing your studying so that you can study for multiple tests, and other time and life saving hacks for finals week.

1. Figure Out Your Actual Finals Schedule

If you want to manage your time during finals week the first thing you need to do RIGHT NOW is check out your finals week schedule. Where are you supposed to be and when? Confirm this with your professors if you need to. Then map it out on a sheet of paper day by day, hour by hour. Once you have that information set in stone it can really help you plan the next step in the time management process.

See If Your School Has Rules For How Many Tests You Can Have A Day During Finals Week

Many schools have a limit of how many tests you can have during a single day or how many tests you can have during a 24 hour period but many students don't take advantage of this awesome opportunity to reschedule their exams. IF your school has a policy like this it seems that most schools don't want you to have three or more exams in one day which is entire possible depending on when your classes are as sometimes it feels that finals week schedules are so radically different from class schedules.

It is important that you figure out your schedule as soon as possible because some schools make you request this rescheduling in advance, which I can understand because often teachers will have to rearrange their entire schedule in order to make this happen if they don't teach multiple sections of the class you are taking. If you must reschedule it's probably a good idea to reach out early just out of common courtesy.

Many students don't reschedule because they just want to get finals over with as soon as possible, but be sure that your grades are ready to wing it if you do.

2. Tally Your grades & Figure Out Where Your Focus Needs To Be

After you figure out your schedule, you need to figure out where your priorities lay. A number of factors go into this decision and while they are mostly grade based, there are other factors as well:

What is your grade in the class?

First and foremost, base it around your grade in the class. If you have a 100 in a class, how much can (or can't) this knock your grade down. Sometimes you are blessed because your grade will be an A even if you get an F on the test. Those classes are always the best, and in order to understand that you need to calculate your grade. This grade calculator on Ben Eggleston's website has literally saved my life when I have a class who doesn't have a simple grading scheme. If your professor's grades are based on percentages this calculator will seriously be your best friend.

  • Can you climb, drastically fall, or are you stuck in place? Further elaborating on the point I made earlier, you need to understand something--sometimes your grade is pretty locked in place. Often you may be stuck to get a B unless by chance you make a 117% on the final. If this is the case, figure out the lowest you can make to maintain your B and try to shoot above that score. On the other hand, sometimes it is SO easy to fall into a C or below unless you get a certain grade on a test.
    • These may seem like similar stories, but think of a person who has an 86 B versus a person who has an 80 B. One person is a little more secure in the fact that messing up a little on the exam will not hurt them, and one is pulling what my Chemistry teacher in high school used to say is a "Barely B."
    • These two students will study drastically different because of how comfortable they are in the skin of being a B student. The first one has had a mixture of As and Bs and feels more confident in their ability to maintain while the second student has probably had some good Bs but also some Cs and they are so close to the edge.
      • The same can be said of a person with a 90 A versus a 96 A. The first student has had some As but also quite a few Bs, whereas the second one probably had almost exclusively different variations of an A. The student with a 96 will feel more confident because they have had more practice getting As than the student with a 90.
    • All of this to say, think about how comfortable you are in your ability to maintain or go to the next level with your score. Also think about the weight of falling if that is a possibility. Then factor that into where you focus when studying.

Is the final cumulative?

Second, is the test cumulative? Cumulative tests are always going to be more difficult than regular tests as you need to spend time relearning some concepts  from months ago in some cases. Cumulative tests tend to happen when the material builds on each other (think math and science related tests) but honestly cumulative tests can happen anytime anywhere.

If the test is cumulative that doesn't mean you have to start freaking out just yet, but it does mean you may have to prioritize the test if you don't remember a lot of the earlier material. You need time to fully immerse yourself to properly study for a cumulative test, especially if you are a student who likes to binge study (aka pulling all-nighters the night before, taking the test, and then forgetting everything once you are done.) 

If you have a pretty solid grasp on the material you may not need to spend a lot of time on cumulative tests but I would personally make them a bigger priority than tests that cover recent material only.

What are your test trends?

Third, what are the trends with how you have done on previous tests? You need to go to your test scores and notice trends. What are your test scores telling you? Below I am going to walk you through a few examples to show you how I might conceptualize test trends for four fictional students.

Fictional Test Scores

  • Student One: In this example, student one had three exams that got progressively worse. They started with a 90, then an 85, and then the last test score they received was an 80. This doesn't mean that the student can't score better, but the general trend has been a downward trend, so if they need more than an 80 to get the grade that they want, it would be in their best interest to prioritize the test.
  • Student Two: In this example, student two has a pretty straightforward upward trajectory in their test scores. They started with a 90, then a 95, and then lastly they received a 100. It could be believed that their final score will range between a 90-100 based on prior experience. Depending on the score they have and the score they want to maintain they may not need to prioritize the test.
  • Student Three: This student is pretty stagnant. They haven't made any gains or negatives over the course of their exams as they have made a 90 on all of their exams. Depending on the type of exam they have and given that they maintain similar study habits it can be seen that they will probably make a similar score. On the other hand, based on the score of 90 it can be seen that this student is potentially a borderline "Barely A" student (but we can't tell for sure because we don't know what they got on other assignments.) If they are a borderline student they may still want to prioritize the test. Obviously this would probably be a different situation if the student had received 96 As on all previous tests.
  • Student Four: This student is a doozy. They did well on the first and second tests getting a 90 and 100 respectively, but then test three threw them for a loop and they got a 85. It would be in their best interest to reflect on why their last score was so low (Did they have other projects that week? Did they grow too confident in their testing abilities based on the upward trend? Did they study inefficiently?) Based on the answers to that reflection students in this situation should assess how seriously they take the final exam so they can make sure that get the grade they want.

When are your tests?

Now, let's go back to the schedule we made in step one. This is not the end all be all of how you should study (because we are talking about other factors obviously.) You can easily study in order of test date, but in order to do that you need to feel really secure in all your test scores. It is important to understand when your tests are though.

For example, if your hardest test is on the last day of finals week, you may not have to put all your effort and energy into that test right away, but it does need to be on your mind throughout the week. Understanding when your tests are will help you pace yourself and study effectively during finals week.

What is the layout of the test?

You must also think about what they layout of the test is.

  • Is the test multiple choice, short answer, essay, a mixture of all those?
  • What test methods do you do best? Do you flourish on essay test or do better with fill in the blank?
  • How many questions are on the test?
  • Does the timing to take the test feel right or rushed?

Once you think about these questions at length you will be able to determine your thoughts about taking the test and how difficult it will or won't be for you. If you feel good about how many questions are on the test and you do well with the testing methods you may not need to prioritize the test. However if the timing for the test or the test method doesn't work well with you putting in extra studying time may help you feel more at ease so you may want to prioritize studying for the test.


Once you have ALL of these questions thought out remember the following statement:

Prioritization doesn't mean don't study

Prioritization means that you should study the tests in order of importance, but it never means don't study for a test. There will be certain tests that you barely have to study for, but you should do the minimal amount of studying necessary to feel good about the test if possible. You need to make sure you feel comfortable on test day and that you don't squander an opportunity for a particular grade. Prioritize how much time you spend studying for each test as that is important, but always study at least a little bit.

3. Start early, end early

All-nighters are not okay. The best advice I can give to you is to start early so you can end early. Start studying for your tests way before finals week so that you can break study sessions into reasonable chunks and so that you don't have to pull as many all-nighters. I get that sometimes it's necessary, but your goal should be to minimize them as much as possible. A long while ago I discussed the dangers of all-nighters and why I don't like them. Follow those thoughts, and plan better study schedules.

When you study longer you can cut out a lot of sleepless nights which would be good for your overall health during finals week. Don't stress out, instead, make sure you have an adequate study plan that breaks your studying down.

4. Manage your time using the pomodoro technique

Y'all already know how obsessed I am with the Pomodoro Technique. I explain this technique more in this blog post, but this method of studying really helps me stay focused and power through tasks without getting too distracted. I love this because it has small and larger breaks built in so you aren't studying for hours on end. The act of taking a break really helps because it allows you to take some time away, evaluate your previous study session, and refocus your brain for a new chunk of time. If you don't have that constant ring back to reality it can be easy to go hours "studying" and not actually accomplishing anything.

I am not saying that the Pomodoro Technique will be the answer to all your studying prayers, but I encourage you to test it out and see if it could be the best study method for you.

5. Remember to take actual breaks

Since the Pomodoro Technique includes so many "breaks" it can be easy to skip over the time that you actually need to yourself each day. Yes, the five minute short breaks and 25 minute long breaks are awesome, but they are not a break that you can really grab on to. Take an actual break and de-stress for a bit:

  • Take a nap
  • Read a book
  • Go for a walk
  • Cook a healthy meal
  • Go to the movies

Why is this important to time management? Taking care of yourself during finals week is of the utmost importance. I know it seems counter productive to take a few hours off, but this is a crucial step. You can't do anything if you break down during finals week due to stress. All your careful planning and methodical organizing will be for naught if you end up so sick you can't get out of bed. Taking the time to recharge your thinking cap is so important so that you can survive finals week.

Finals week isn't an easy task. You are literally doing multiple important tasks in all your classes whether that is writing a paper or taking a huge final test. Think of this as the Boss Battle in a video game--you want to make sure you have adequate energy before you go into the final battle.

6. Keep a finals pack nearby

When you are studying for finals, often times studying gets the best of you and you may be studying for a test up until the last minute. Then, the last minute turns into way too close to the time to take your test and you aren't ready to go just yet. This is why you should have a just in case finals pack ready and by the door. What are some things you should consider putting into your finals pack?

  • Scantrons (if your teacher doesn't provide them)
  • A small calculator if you are taking a math class (a small calculator is better than no calculator and being late) and depending on how you store your finals pack, a regular calculator
  • #2 pencils
  • Pens
  • A couple sheets of scratch or ruled paper
  • Snack crackers or 100 calorie snack packs (in case you get hungry)

You can probably fit all of these items inside a ziplock bag or even a tiny tote bag. Have these items packed in case you are running late. Sometimes you get a crappy final exam time (who thought of finals at 8 AM?) or you just are too busy studying to remember the time so having this bag is a lifesaver. 

7. Take a deep breath and slay

Before your test remember to breathe and slay. You got this. You have prepared your heart out and I believe in your hustle. When I want to remind myself of something, I make an inspirational wallpaper. Lucky for you, I got ya covered so you don't have to spend your time procrastinating like I did. Instead, click the picture below and you will be taken to a Dropbox folder where you can download all of my awesome Take A Deep Breath And Slay wallpapers. You can change them out each day of finals week--or you can just use the one you like the most. You can also pick which one(s) you want to download in case you don't want them all.

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Amanda Cross

My name is Amanda Cross and I am the blogger behind The Happy Arkansan. I am a 20 something college graduate, graduate student, and all around awesome person.

The Ultimate College Toolkit

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Write an Outline to Carry Your Essay (and Save You Time)

Many writers, even those with experience, struggle to begin or develop writing assignments. Staring at an empty page can be daunting and frustrating, and maintaining focus as you write can be difficult as well. Enter the outline: it's here to help you write, keep your composition on track to fulfill the assignment, and do it all more quickly than if you tried to write freestyle. In fact, with a good outline you're halfway done with your assignment, because all that's left to do is flesh out each concept into full sentences.

Write An Outline To Carry Your Essay (And Save You Time) | Happy Contributor Adria shares her best tips for producing an essay outline that will help you produce the best paper possible. Click through for essay outline tips that will blow you and your professors away.

1. Format the Document

If you're typing, go ahead and format your document. It's easier to format your document at the start than to wait until you're finished. That's true because, when you're done writing and editing, you're done--you don't want to spend time tidying up and formatting, and you're likely to miss one of the requirements. Format the blank document right away. When you format the document you can easily go down the checklist of requirements for the required style and you also have a bit of a boost to get you started because you've put some information on the page already (even if it's just your name, the course, or a paper title.) If your class does not require specifically formatted documents, I recommend you format them anyway, because it looks nice (your professor will appreciate it) and gives you more practice with formatting.

2. Create a Working Title

The purpose of the working title is to ground you and help you focus on your assignment--while at the same time pumping you up about your topic. Give it a name that appeals to you, like "The Scarlet 'Dear John' Letter" or a self-reflective title like "The Scarlet Letter Essay That Will Earn an A." This title is all for you and to help you get started; you can change it later to a more serious title (...or not) or something that reflects the paper's topic. At the least, give in to your anger and title it something like "The Civil War Was Bad," or "Why I Hate The Scarlet Letter" and it will force you to think critically every time you work on it (why do you hate The Scarlet Letter?).

3. Create a Thesis

A lot of students struggle with creating a thesis. However uninspired you feel, don't skip this step, or you'll be working without direction, which could mean you're wasting time. A thesis is a statement of purpose. It tells readers what to expect from your paper. In addition to stating a purpose, the thesis may explain why that matters. If you need help, start with something basic:

"The Scarlet Letter is depressing." Substitute a more sophisticated word to make it "The Scarlet Letter is tragic." Ask yourself why you feel that way--is it related to the plot? Or maybe you just got a "feeling" while reading. Can you put your finger on it? Is it the imagery used, perhaps? Whatever the reason, it's the conclusion of your thesis. Your thesis now reads like, "The Scarlet Letter is tragic because of dark imagery." That will work, but rephrasing it and getting creative with your word choice will make it stronger: "Dark imagery in The Scarlet Letter achieves the novel's tragic nature." 

For another class, like history, you might write about something like the Civil War and have a starting thesis that, "The Civil War was bad." You might feel silly writing something so obvious--but use the statement to consider why and you'll get a better thesis: "The Civil War was bad because it turned brother against brother," perhaps refined to "The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother."

4. Write Your Thoughts and Reflections 

Here is where you create a word, phrases and ideas dump. Write (or type) everything you can think of about the topic, especially in relation to your thesis. If you hit a roadblock and need help writing concepts, just imagine you're telling your friends about the assignment--how would you describe it to them?

I've read it twice, there are Puritans in it, their attire is stifling/stuffy, they're religious/pious, it's set in young America, small town, everyone knows everyone but they don't know Hester or who her baby daddy is, there's a meteor, it's seen as a sign, the people are superstitious/ignorant, light over dark world/society, they're afraid of the forest, devil, sin, forbidden, restrictions, punishment, self-flagellation, shame & public humiliation, patriarchal society's desire to control, Chillingworth has no life besides tormenting Hester and Dimmesdale, Hester's disobedience and obedience...

The Civil War assignment word dump might look like this:

North vs. South, brother fighting brother, fratricide, a nation divided, a nation sort-of-divided because the South was actually a Confederacy and not unified, the north was controlling, industrialization vs. agriculture, "southern way of life," slavery and plantations, man enslaving fellow man, emancipation, Abraham Lincoln, assassination, propaganda, weapons, progress, struggle, populations, loss of life, loss of humanity...

I usually do the word dump as a bullet list so I can arrange it more easily for the next part.

5. Look for Trends or Associations

It seems pretty easy to make associations from these lists because there are plenty of dichotomies. Dichotomies are the easiest way to find trends--male/female, good/bad, north/south, war/peace, light/dark, alive/dead, etc. A trend could be about colors or numbers, or any shared trait.

In the first I find themes of evil, superstition, knowledge, control, shame...

In the second I find themes of brotherhood, loss and gain, control, violence...

6. Group and Arrange Accordingly

Here's where the outline form emerges. Make your thesis your first point. Then take your trends or themes and make each a point. Make your last point the thesis as well, because it will be a summary in which you again assert your claim and conclude how you supported it. You'll reword the opening thesis later so it doesn't read dully as copy & paste.

  1. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother
  2. Brotherhood
  3. Loss and Gain
  4. Control
  5. Violence
  6. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother

Next, begin to group the other ideas after each point. If you find a concept that could fit in more than one spot, either break it into two more specific ideas or consider it valuable as a link to help you transition from one supporting idea to the next.

  1. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother
  2. Brotherhood
    1. North vs. South
    2. man enslaving fellow man
  3. Loss and Gain
    1. Loss
      1. a nation divided
      2. a nation sort-of-divided because the South was actually a Confederacy and not unified
      3. Abraham Lincoln
      4. "southern way of life"
      5. loss of life
      6. loss of humanity
    2. Gain
      1. emancipation
      2. progress
  4. Control
    1. the north was controlling
    2. emancipation (loss of control of slave owners)
    3. propaganda
  5. Violence
    1. assassination
    2. brother fighting brother
    3. fratricide
    4. weapons
  6. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother

I had a few left over that I discarded. Additionally, some that I grouped together might be redundant--that asks you either to pick the stronger of the two or clarify each. For instance, "brother fighting brother" is similar to "fratricide," meaning to kill one's brother. Because they're grouped under "violence," fratricide is the stronger of the two--however, emphasizing the process of fighting or struggling might be more useful in your paper than the finality of killing.

The section for "Loss and Gain" had so many under it that I made two subsections. I fit "emancipation" under both "Loss and Gain" and "Control," adding clarification of how it fit with control. 

7. Create a Mini-Thesis for Each Grouping

Because each paragraph acts as its own point, it's sort of a micro-essay that makes a claim and is supported by evidence from your source. Consider the information grouped behind your main points--how do they support, or what argument do you see them making? Point 3's subsections have theses, too, but these are obviously the two halves of 3's thesis.

  1. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother
  2. Brotherhood was tested, but it had already been strained by slavery
    1. North vs. South
    2. man enslaving fellow man
  3. Losses were sustained, such as loss of brotherhood and humanity, life--including, ultimately, our president--and a way of life, but the gains of emancipation and progress restored humanity.
    1. Losses were sustained, such as loss of brotherhood and humanity, life--including, ultimately, our president--and a way of life.
      1. a nation divided
      2. a nation sort-of-divided because the South was actually a Confederacy and not unified
      3. Abraham Lincoln
      4. "southern way of life"
      5. loss of life
      6. loss of humanity
    2. The gains of emancipation and progress restored humanity
      1. emancipation
      2. progress
  4. The war was fought because of and for control.
    1. the north was controlling
    2. emancipation (loss of control of slave owners)
    3. propaganda
  5. The war caused our nation to resort to terrible violence.
    1. assassination
    2. brother fighting brother
    3. fratricide
    4. weapons
  6. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother

These might not be the best theses--but it's a great start, something to build on and work from, at the least!

8. Finalize Your Thesis Based on Supporting Information & Rework the Outline

Now that you have your supporting ideas, you get a better sense of what you're trying to argue. Time to rework your thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother..." Ask yourself how or why and look at your points.

The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother, sustaining severe losses and resulting in terrible violence in the fight for control and progress.

You'll noticed the supporting points occur out of order, the second main point doesn't feature in this statement and point 3's two subsections were split up. I would now rework the outline to follow this new flow... and the second main point that wasn't used can be featured in either the introduction or conclusion to support the paper as a whole, or reworked to support another point--whatever seems best to you as you work on the paper.

  1. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother, sustaining severe losses and resulting in terrible violence in the fight for control and progress.
  2. Losses were sustained, such as loss of brotherhood and humanity, life--including, ultimately, our president--and a way of life.
    1. a nation divided
    2. a nation sort-of-divided because the South was actually a Confederacy and not unified
    3. Abraham Lincoln
    4. "southern way of life"
    5. loss of life
    6. loss of humanity
  3. The war caused our nation to resort to terrible violence.
    1. assassination
    2. brother fighting brother
    3. fratricide
    4. weapons
  4. The war was fought because of and for control.
    1. the north was controlling
    2. emancipation (loss of control of slave owners)
    3. propaganda
  5. The gains of emancipation and progress restored humanity
    1. emancipation
    2. progress
  6. Thesis: The greatest evil of the Civil War was that it turned brother against brother
    1. Brotherhood was tested, but it had already been strained by slavery
      1. North vs. South
      2. man enslaving fellow man

9. Plug in

You can use the outline to refer to when you write your paper, but a better way is to begin writing and connecting sentences on top of the outline framework. Start removing the framework and plug in each of your thoughts in full sentences, flowing from each subpoint to subpoint. Supporting points generally make a paragraph, or perhaps more if you have a longer assignment or a large subpoint. Make sure you transition well between each point.

Keep writing even if you have difficulty--the framework is there for you, so just work with what you provided yourself. Don't be afraid to graft in information you didn't include in your outline--your paper grows organically based on the frame you create for it.

10. Finish

After writing, edit as needed. Make your sentences stronger or give paragraphs better flow.  Finalize your title, give your assignment a good introduction and write a strong conclusion that will leave readers with no doubt of your assignment's intention. Remember: work on assignments in advance of their due dates and you will have more time to edit and problem solve, or have someone else help you edit your assignment to make the final version the best it can be.

Click the bio to check out more from Adria!

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The Ultimate College Toolkit

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5 Survival Tips for Incoming Freshmen

For every freshman, college is a new environment, it is a world of its own set for you to discover. As you pack your bags and wave goodbye to ma and pa, no one tells you the realities of this journey. You can read about it, or ask older cousins or friends who have embarked on this journey but the truth is, everyone graduates college with their own experience. No experience is ever the same. College is often a testing ground, it is usually the transition from adolescence into adulthood and it is generally when most people are discovering who they really are, what they are here for, what they would like to pursue thereafter etc. But it is important that you take each day as it comes. So, here are five handy tips you should take on board as you enter this new chapter of your life.

5 Survival Tips For Incoming Freshmen | Being a freshman is difficult, Happy Contributor Motunde shares her best tips for making sure that your freshman experience is amazing by sharing her five best survival tips on the blog today.

1. Do your research

For most students, college is a foreign place. It is a huge step up from high school where you had the comfort of teachers who would pamper you, parents, who you could rely on for support and safety. Not that you don’t get that in college, you do to an extent but here there is a greater level of responsibility and that’s why it is important you know your facts. Prior to your arrival, do some research online, check out their website, look through the campus map, locate a few of your lecture halls, find out where the library, cafeteria or things that interest you are. If you are fortunate enough, visit your campus at least twice. This is advisable for everyone as this is where you will be spending the next four years of your life so you want to make sure you are comfortable and more aware of your surroundings. Thus, this gives you more confidence on induction day and eases some tension because there will be new faces…I mean who are these people?

2. Find out who your roommate is

Most times, you have the opportunity of knowing your roommate especially during open days. This gives you the privilege of bonding and getting to know each other- course details, background, interests and with social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, it is easier for you to keep in contact and possibly start a friendship. This also helps in letting off the pressure with the fact that you know someone! However the Freshers’ event is always an opportunity to meet new people, socialise- college brings people from all over the globe and remember college is more than an academic training, it is a whole new learning experience, developing the necessary skills you would need for the corporate world or whatever venture you would like to pursue and relationships are very important. Make an effort to step outside your comfort zone and do some networking!! Besides you are still new, making friends with sophomores who are more familiar with the surroundings will help especially when you get lost or you need to get somewhere. We’ve all felt this!!

3. Stay organized

Deadlines, sorority meetings, this society and that event, essay deadlines. Summary of a college week and it is even busier in the first few weeks of college where every society seems appealing to join and you are curious and want to explore your many interests as well as keep up with your lectures and tutorials. Therefore, it is more than important you stay organized and up to date with all that is going on, I would advise buying a planner before you arrive, this way you can fill in the most important dates and keep abreast of your week/month schedule. Also, your alarm and calendar on your iPhone will definitely come in handy! Be on top of your game with deadlines, always write them down then write out a to-do list from the most important to the least important things you need to get done.

4. Do all the necessary ‘Target’ shopping

You want to come to college prepared. Therefore, buy all your books, stationeries, toiletries and the necessities beforehand. You want to leave the first few weekends to rest and save your money instead of running from place to place trying to find the nearest drugstore etc. Write a list of all the things you need and as you buy them, tick them off. Sometimes there are always emergencies that spring up which is fine but the majority of your essentials should be purchased.

5. Have a list of important contact details

Some colleges/universities usually have important details such as a security number or maintenance telephone number in case you are stuck or you are unsure of something. It is always good to keep these numbers just in case. It would also be good to have it written down in a notepad, I know it sound outdated in this tech world but still things still go wrong, you might lose your phone or the battery can die out. It's always good to have a backup plan while at college! This way you are on top of your game. That is what college prepares you for, the real world, it is scary, we live in a world where people are becoming increasingly independent and experiences such as the one you are about to embark on or have embarked on can truly make or break you.

Remember to learn all that you can!

The most important thing is to learn all you can. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, I learned this from Michelle Obama, it is something she has said time and time again at her commencement speeches. If you don’t understand something, ask, it doesn’t matter what XYZ will say, you are there for a reason and you have that right. Besides, you are a new student so that should be expected. Try new things; do not be afraid to step out of your comfort zone each day- that’s where greatness lies. Most times, you will be fearful, that’s normal, but let that be your fuel to success.

Good luck to all the incoming freshmen! Always remember you can do it!

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The Ultimate College Toolkit

Dec15

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