Do you ever read a post on The Happy Arkansan and love it so much that you want to support the blog? Today I am here to share a few ways that you can do just that!

No matter if you can give just $1 or $100, I will love and appreciate your support for the blog.

What does your money go to?

Running The Blog: Money from my tip jar will go to things like keeping my domain name, paying for Squarespace, paying for my email service provider, and paying for tools I use like Tailwind and Canva.

Paying The Bills: I have day-to-day everyday life bills that part of the proceeds from my tip jar will go to help.

Keeping Up My Shopping Habit: While not often, sometimes I need to do shopping for the blog or my side projects like my Society6 shop. Part of my tip jar proceeds may go to paying for pieces for my fashion posts or purchasing a product on Creative Market so I can design more.

Charity | Some of the physical products I sell have a charitable aspect to them. Sometimes the money you donate is automatically given, and sometimes I make the personal donation myself.

How Can You Support The Blog?

There are many ways to support what I do here:

Tip Me

Tipping is not mandatory, but if you have it in your budget I would appreciate any donation that you can give.

The tips I receive will go straight into doing things like running the blog, covering time I spend writing unsponsored posts, etc.

Tip Me Via Paypal

Teespring

I have a budding Teespring shop where I will be selling tons of cute shirts and miscellaneous items with lots of cool, snarky sayings. I get at least $10 per each purchase you make on Teespring so it's a great way to support the blog while wearing some adorable shirts, here is a sample:

Some of these shirts have a charitable portion as well with up to 25% given to charity.

Society6

I have a Society6 shop with tons of different items for sale! If you cute mugs, tapestries, bedspreads, cards, notebooks, etc.--I have you covered! I get 10% of all purchases and I also donate 25% of my profits to the Southern Poverty Law Center.